Violence is not affecting U.S. citizens visiting Mexico and Americans should not cancel their vacations

article
updated 4:42 p.m. CT, Thurs., March. 12, 2009

(excerpted from original article)

Homeland Security official Roger Rufe said while the violence along the border in Mexico is appalling, violent crimes have not increased in U.S. border cities as a result. He said kidnappings are up, but violent crime is down.

“We’re not so concerned, at least at this point, about that violence spilling over into our cities,” he said.

Warnings issued to travelers
Further, the Homeland Security Department’s attache to Mexico said the violence in Mexico is not as dangerous to U.S. tourists as has been portrayed.

Alonzo Pena said the violence is in isolated areas of the country and only affects the people involved in criminal activity. He said the violence is not affecting U.S. citizens visiting Mexico and Americans should not cancel their vacations in the country.

Earlier this month, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives warned college students on spring breaks not to travel to parts of northern Mexico because it was too dangerous.

In February, the State Department advised travelers to avoid areas of prostitution and drug-dealing in Mexico.